Thursday, 24 May 2018

Pianists in a brothel, These present discontents #ConquestofDough #EROEI


These present discontents #ConquestofDough #EROEI
rogerglewisMay 24, 2018Uncategorized

Stealing this Joke for The Conquest of Dough






Even by its own lights, this neoliberal orthodoxy has failed, becoming progressively more economically destructive. Outsourcing skilled, well-paid jobs whilst maintaining the relentless adulation of consumption has driven debt sharply upwards, such that ten-year growth of £215bn in British GDP has been accompanied by a £1,370bn escalation in debt. Undermining the tax base has undercut the provision of public services, whilst monetary policies geared towards co-existence with debt have created huge deficits in pension provision. The emphasis on the pursuit of quick material gain has favoured speculation whilst undermining the patient creation of value through innovation and initiative. The uncomfortable suspicion lurks that, when the economy slumps, pension provision collapses and the debt burden becomes overwhelming, the masterminds of this state of affairs will already have departed to pastures new.

Although they were recorded in 1938, Jelly Roll Morton's unedited Library Of Congress recordings weren't released in their entirety for over fifty years, because some parts were just too damn dirty. Here are Jelly's most risqué songs, along with his tales of turn of the century New Orleans whorehouses, honky tonks, neighborhood parades and pimp attire. Not for the faint of heart.

1 The Dirty Dozen 4:30
This is "The Dirty Dozen." I really think this originated in Chicago. I heard this tune about 1908, when I happened to be in Chicago. It seems like Chicago had been, started to be, beginning to be a freakish center. It seems like that there was a lot of sayings about what the different people would be doing and the uncultured way and the sex appeal. So I heard that song then.
Oh you dirty motherfucker
You old cocksucker
You dirty son of a bitch
You bastard
You're everything
And yo' mammy don't wear no drawers
Yes, you did me this, you did me that
You did your father
You did your mother
You did everybody you come to
'Cause yo' mammy don't wear no drawers
That's the Dirty Dozen
Oh, the Dirty lovin' Dozen
The Dirty Dozen
Yes yo' mammy don't wear no drawers
This would be played in the houses in Chicago where they didn't mind about the language. Different places, sometimes I would visit these places. I was supposed to be one of the higher-ups. 'Course I'd sometimes I'd walk in and catch those things. It would be very embarrassing a lot of times, just the fact that old King Jelly Roll Morton was there. But I'd catch 'em and they wouldn't stop. Just keep on playing, you know. Some would care and some of 'em wouldn't. The gals, they would have their dress up way up to their ass. Just shakin' it and breakin' it. At that time they wore what you called—the ladies did—the split drawers. They'd just be shakin' it down. And some guy plunking on the piano, some rough looking guy, I wouldn't know who he was. They had several of 'em. And they'd sing it right over and over. They'd sing all kinds of verses. Some of them meant something, some of them didn't have any rhymes, and some did and so forth and on.
So I had a bitch
Wouldn't fuck me 'cause she had the itch
Yes she's my bitch
Oh yo' mammy wouldn't wear no drawers


The main theme was the mammy wouldn't wear no drawers, I thought it was a very disgusting mammy that wouldn't wear some underwear

Said you dirty motherfucker
You old cocksucker
You dirty son of a bitch
Oh everything you know
Oh you low bitch
Yes and everything you'll do
Mmm—yes—mmm, Lord
Yes you did
Yes you dirty bitch
Suck my prick
Oh eat me up
All that kind of stuff
Yes yo' mammy wouldn't wear no drawers
Said, look up bitch, you make me mad
I tell you 'bout the puppies that your sister had
Oh it was a fad
She fucked a hog
She fucked a dog
I know the dirty bitch would fuck a frog
'Cause yo' mammy don't wear no drawers
I went one day
Out to the lake
I seen your mammy
A-fuckin' a snake
All she tried, she tried to shake
All she shuck, shake on the cake
Mammy don't wear no drawers
2 Honky Tonk Blues 5:12

Tony [Jackson] used to play these things for what, in the sporting houses, for what they called the naked dances. Of course, they were naked dances all right because they absolutely was stripped. They was stripped. Of course, a naked dance was something that was supposed to be real art in New Orleans. Of course, there were many houses in New Orleans. The District there was considered the second to France, meaning the second greatest in the world, with extensions for blocks and blocks, on one side of the north side of Canal Street, which is supposed to be the highest class, although the highest class district ran from the lowest to the highest, meaning in price and caliber alike. We had a uptown side of the District, which was considered very big, but the price was pretty much even all the way round. And of course they turned out a many different artists in that section, but never the first-class artist because the money wasn 't there.

Alan Lomax: What were some of the tunes they used to play down the lower class districts?