Skip to main content

Election 2017, Debates 2010, 2015 and 2017 in word clouds. The Hug that said it all in 2015.

The following 3 data presentations are what you will make of them. I carried out the analysis for my own curiosity as to whether the political debates ever touch on Ideology or Ethics. What it is to be Liberal, Conservative or Progressive.
In the 2015 debates Leanne Woods, Nicola Sturgeon and Natalie Bennet stood out for me as the most politically pedagogical as they all mentioned Austerity and Cuts and Woods and Sturgeon have even identified explicitly the Ideology of Neo Liberalism in their interview appearance that campaign.
Draw your own conclusions of course.

In 2017 Brexit was the early runner and of course, the position of the 3 Female leaders who showed up all being remainers did not find it convenient to draw the attention of voters to the hopelessly Neo-Liberal and embedded Austerity positions of the EU, with Austerity baked into trade deals and institutions alike.

The neo liberal Ed Milliband missing out on the Anti Austerity and decidely anti-Neo-Liberal 2015 group hug.

United Kingdom general election debates, 2010

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gordon BrownDavid Cameron official.jpgNick Clegg by the 2009 budget cropped.jpg
Gordon Brown
David Cameron
Nick Clegg
Liberal Democrats
20102015 debates →
The United Kingdom general election debates of 2010 consisted of a series of three leaders' debates between the leaders of the three main parties contesting the 2010 United Kingdom general electionGordon BrownPrime Minister and leader of the Labour PartyDavid CameronLeader of the Opposition and Conservative Party; and Nick Clegg, leader of the third largest political party in the UK, the Liberal Democrats. They were the first such debates to be broadcast live in the run-up to a UK election.
The debates ran without a break for 90 minutes and were broadcast weekly by ITVBSkyB and the BBC over three successive Thursday evenings starting on 15 April. They were moderated by Alastair StewartAdam Boulton and David Dimbleby respectively. The first half of each debate focused on a particular theme (domestic, international and economic affairs), before general issues were discussed. The questions were not disclosed to the leaders before the debate.
In addition to the leaders' debates, on 29 March, the three main parties' financial spokesmen participated in a debate focusing on the economy, with the Chancellor of the Exchequer Alistair Darling debating with the Shadow Chancellor George Osborne and Liberal Democrats' Treasury spokesman Vince Cable on Channel 4. Debates also took place between 19 April and 5 May, a series of debates also took place on the BBC political TV series The Daily Politics, between members of the incumbent Labour Cabinet and their ConservativeLiberal Democrat counterparts and representatives from the Green Party, the Scottish National PartyPlaid Cymru and the UK Independence Party.
Debates were also held in Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland, due to the devolved nature of various aspects of government in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. In Scotland and Wales, representatives of three main parties were joined by respective nationalist party representatives who stand MPs only in Scotland and Wales, while in Northern Ireland, due to the main parties having no seats, debates were held between the four largest Northern Irish parties. The arrangements for the UK-wide leaders debates were criticised for being restricted to the main UK parties excluding other national minor parties and nationalist parties in Scotland and Wales, for covering many domestic matters which are devolved from Westminster, and also for being held in three locations solely in England.

created at

United Kingdom general election debates, 2015

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
David Cameron official.jpgEd MilibandNick Clegg by the 2009 budget cropped.jpg
David Cameron
Ed Miliband
Nick Clegg
Liberal Democrats
Nigel Farage MEP 1, Strasbourg - Diliff.jpgNatalie Bennett Take Back Our World.jpgNicola Sturgeon 2.jpg
Nigel Farage
Natalie Bennett
Nicola Sturgeon
Leanne Wood.jpg
Leanne Wood
Plaid Cymru
← 2010 debates20152017 debates →
The term "United Kingdom general election debates" of 2015 refers to a series of four live television programmes featuring the main political party leaders that took place in March/April 2015 in the run-up to the general election. After various prior proposals and arguments over which parties should be represented,[1][2] there was a single debate between the leaders of seven British parties:[3]
There was a second debate involving the "challengers", those in the above list who were not members of the outgoing coalition government. There were also two programmes - one with Cameron and Miliband; one with Cameron, Miliband and Clegg - in which the leaders answered questions but did not debate head-to-head.
Following the result of the election, a survey of 3,019 people, carried out by Panelbase, found that 38% of voters considered the debates to have influenced their voting intention.[4][5]

austerity (11) balance (12) believe (16) benefits (13) bennett (17) better (17) billion (23) britain (23) build (17) care (17) change (22) control (15) country (51) create (13) cuts (40) deal (13) debate (22) debt (19) decisions (12) economy (18) ed (17) education (20) election (14) end (15) eu (14) europe (17) european (16) fair (14) family (15) free (17) full (12) future (22) generation (19) give (16) going (26) government (19) happens (12) health (17) help (25) home (23) host (16) hours (11) house (21) immigration (43) important (13) invest (16) issue (19) jobs (28) labor (20) leaders (19) living (22) lot (13) miliband (37) million (17) minister (26) money (21) mr (54) national (13) needs (11) nhs (29) nick (12) nigel (13) open (13) parliament (12) party (37) pay (28) people (126) plan (24) point (13) politics (12) pounds (34) prime (28) private (14) problem (13) promise (12) public (19) question (21) schools (17) services (28) social (14) speaker (74) spending (18) sturgeon (12) sure (16) system (16) talk (18) tax (20) thank (34) things (16) think (42) tonight (16) tuition (11) university (12) vote (22) wage (14) wales (17) work (38) world (15) years (41) young (30)
created at

United Kingdom general election, 2017

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
United Kingdom general election, 2017
United Kingdom

← 20158 June 20172022 →

All 650 seats in the House of Commons
326 seats needed for a majority
Opinion polls
Theresa MayJeremy Corbyn
LeaderTheresa MayJeremy Corbyn
Leader since11 July 201612 September 2015
Leader's seatMaidenheadIslington North
Last election330 seats, 36.9%232 seats, 30.4%
Current seats330229
Seats neededSteadyIncrease 97

Nicola SturgeonTim Farron
LeaderNicola SturgeonTim Farron
PartySNPLiberal Democrat
Leader since14 November 201416 July 2015
Leader's seatNot contesting[n 1]Westmorland & Lonsdale
Last election56 seats, 4.7%8 seats, 7.9%
Current seats549
Seats neededN/A[n 2]Increase 317

A map of UK parliamentary constituencies.

Incumbent Prime Minister

2005 election  MPs
2010 election  MPs
2015 election  MPs
2017 election  MPs
The United Kingdom general election of 2017 is scheduled to take place on 8 June 2017. Each of the 650 parliamentary constituencies will elect one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons, the lower house of Parliament.
In line with the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011, an election had not been due until 7 May 2020, but a call for a snap election by Prime Minister Theresa May received the necessary two-thirds majority in a 522 to 13 vote in the House of Commons on 19 April 2017.
The Conservative Party, which has governed since 2015 (and as a senior coalition partner from 2010), is defending a majority of 12 against the Labour Party, the official opposition. The third largest party, the Scottish National Party, won 56 of the 59 Scottish constituencies in 2015. The Liberal Democrats, and the Northern Irish Democratic Unionist Party, are the fourth and fifth largest parties, with 9 and 8 seats respectively.
Negotiation positions following Britain's invocation of Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union in March 2017 to leave the EU are expected to dominate the election campaign. Opinion polling for the popular vote since the election was called has given May's Conservatives a significant lead over Labour led by Jeremy Corbyn.


created at

Popular posts from this blog

Syria Cui Bono, Incitatus (Boris Johnson) Caligula (john Kerry) and the Curious case of the New Consul at the United Nations Security Council (Updated 7th April , Trump ordered attack On Syria)


Roger Lewis7 April 2017 at 12:56 Syria is all about Gas, not poison Sarin Gas but Gas Pipelines. It is also not about Hydro Carbons in themselves but the market for hydrocarbons and which currency contracts of supply are settled in otherwise known  as,  US petrodollar hegemony.
Legitimate question. Does Jared Kushner have any interests in the Leviathan Gas field or any of the Israeli-backed Pipeline projects? #MAGA#Drain The Swamp. Starting to dig around will report back.

THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE GAS RING. QATARI GAS, OR SAUDI HEGENOMY, TRUMP BACKS THE SAUDIS? TANGLED WEB INDEED Tangled Web,  Syria and Gas. Trump meets Egyptian President, that is a rejection of the Moslem Brotherhood, siding against Qatar in Syria and With Saudi broadly and therefore the ISIL Wahabbist and Saud…

Meet The Fuggers, Brexit, The Euro and Clueless Elites.

Meet the Fuggers or, its the Money Power stupid. Brexit, The Euro and clueless Elites.

The Eastern Roman empire under Justinian saw the seeds of its final fall to The Ottomans when Abd El Melik started paying tribute in Gold coinage under his own Political Branding you might say.

With all the talk of Brexit being the removal of a final obstacle to the deeper federation of a European State transcending tiresome nationalism, perhaps a little review of History, particularly Monetary history, might not be such a bad thing.

In the review of European competences carried out as a consultation by the foreign office regarding Brexit and or reform requirements of the Eu, two of the papers need to be considered in the context of the Money power argument.

The first paper considered is the Subsidiarity and proportionality aspects of the Lisbon treaty and the competences of the EU institutions vis National and regional democratic institutions. This is a trade-off between Centralised Efficiency and …

Cashless Society, BlockChain, Global Warming, Gold, Carbon . Geo Political Full House.

rogerglewis9:02 am on October 26, 2017Permalink | Reply | Edit | FollowIMF Head on Climate: “we will be toasted, roasted and grilled”  Roger Lewis October 26, 2017 at 7:57 am # Legarde pushing the AGW Global Warming Narrative reported on Watts Up With That today. Upticks in CLimate Stories and developments on the Petro Dollar are quite common.
I am certain that the two things are not unrelated. rogerglewis Your comment is awaiting moderation.
October 25, 2017 at 11:51 pm
Things are really hotting up on the Future Prospects of the Petro Dollar. Climate Change particularly the AGW CO2 Narrative is clung to with religious zeal and promoted by Finance Elites, why is that?
China are rolling out the Petro Yuan, backed by gold. The IMF wish to cling to the Petro Dollar hegemon this is best done by having t…